Coercive Coalescence (2013)
Painting by Josh Bowe


  • Painting, Paper
  • One of a kind artwork
  • Size: 118.11 × 90.55 × 0.12 in (unframed) / 118.11 × 90.55 in (actual image size)
  • This artwork is sold unframed
  • Signed on the front
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Josh Bowe

United Kingdom

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Artist's description:

The culmination of a year of painting on this project - a collaboration with Founders Sculpture Prize Winner 2013 George Triggs.

Coercive Coalescence Acrylic 230 x 300 cms 'Coercive Coalescence' explores the schism between human characteristic forces as opposed to forces of persona. A collective body forms through dedicated observations of figurative movement. A disengagement with depicting personality is heightened through avoidance of cosmetic detail and through a mechanical thinking in duplicating the dynamism of a moving figure. Paradoxically, a cohesiveness develops through the amalgamation of somewhat in-congruent appendages. Symbolically, the human shell serves as suggestion for both an 'inward' contemplative state as well as the 'outer' physical process of art making - Ellen Jaye Benson and Josh Bowe

For every action, a reaction ; from collision, division ; from uniform motion, unity. Each body is shown in isolation and lacks both individuality and cosmetic detail, but all respond to the same external, chaotic physical force. This work is symbolic of the the way innate human characteristics are forged into a public persona and – extrapolating further – the way societies are coerced into cohesive units. A collective body is formed ; the figures are intertwined but independent, their hands eternally reaching out. The outer mechanical process of making art (and Freud’s ‘ego’) is reflected in the homologous poses ; the inward contemplative state (Freud’s ‘id’) is represented by the differences in direction - Mark Sleigh

Materials used:

Acrylic paint