Artist's description:

The Westbury or Bratton White Horse is a hill figure on the escarpment of Salisbury Plain, approximately 2.5 km (1.6 mi) east of Westbury in England. Located on the edge of Bratton Downs and lying just below an Iron Age hill fort, it is the oldest of several white horses carved in Wiltshire. It was restored in 1778, an action which may have obliterated a previous horse which had occupied the same slope. A contemporary engraving of the 1760s appears to show a horse facing in the opposite direction, and also rather smaller than the present figure. However, there is at present no documentary or other evidence for the existence of a chalk horse at Westbury before the year 1742.
The origin of the Westbury White Horse is obscure. It is often claimed to commemorate King Alfred's victory at the Battle of Eðandun in 878, and while this is not impossible, there is no trace of such a legend before the second half of the eighteenth century.
In the 1950s, the horse was vandalised. It was repaired, but the damage could still be seen. The horse was fully restored in 2007 but less than four years later is again showing signs of serious visible distress. The BBC announced on 2 March 2012 that it is to be cleaned again in 2012.[2] Work began 11 April 2012, complete 19 April 2012.

Materials used:

Giclée print using pigment inks on Hahnemühle Baryta FB paper.

White Horse - Westbury (2012)

$119.92

  • Photography (limited edition), Paper
  • From a limited edition of 25
  • Size: 16.54 × 11.69 in (unframed) / 13.78 × 8.66 in (actual image size)
  • This artwork is sold unframed
  • Signed and numbered on the front
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