Artwork description:

Large Edition

Due to the large print size this artwork will be shipped unsigned directly from our print studio to your home.

This is the famous Tulip Staircase at The Queen's House in Greenwich, London. It was the first centrally unsupported helical staircase constructed in England (circa 1616). It was installed by the architect Inigo Jones who was first significant British architect of the early modern period. The Queen's House was the first consciously classical building to have been constructed in Britain.

I wanted to capture the pure abstract shape of the staircase and did this by lying on the floor with my head and camera directly beneath the central skylight. The shape mimics the golden ratio in geometry which is suggested to be the most pleasing shape and form in existence.

Winner of Nikon In-frame 'perspectives' competition - December 2013
Winner of the Viewbug 'Architecture - People's Choice' competition award.

Available Editions:
Small Edition - A4 approx. (150) Printed by the artist.
Original Edition - A3 approx. (50) Printed by the artist. !!! SOLD OUT !!!
Medium Edition - From A3 up to 30" tall (150) Printed by 3rd party professional lab.
Large Edition - Above 30" long edge (150) Printed by 3rd party professional lab.
Total Edition Size = 500

Framing and mounting available - please ask for further information

Rest assured your print will reach you in perfect condition - guaranteed.

(low-res image to protect copyright)

Materials used:

Archival quality inks and fine art paper

Tags:
#black and white #monochrome #pattern #geometry #spiral #spiral staircase #queens house #stairway #tulip staircase #red chip 

The Queen's House Tulip Staircase L

Photograph 
by Ben Robson Hull

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Now £149.5  £299

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Artwork description
Minus

Large Edition

Due to the large print size this artwork will be shipped unsigned directly from our print studio to your home.

This is the famous Tulip Staircase at The Queen's House in Greenwich, London. It was the first centrally unsupported helical staircase constructed in England (circa 1616). It was installed by the architect Inigo Jones who was first significant British architect of the early modern period. The Queen's House was the first consciously classical building to have been constructed in Britain.

I wanted to capture the pure abstract shape of the staircase and did this by lying on the floor with my head and camera directly beneath the central skylight. The shape mimics the golden ratio in geometry which is suggested to be the most pleasing shape and form in existence.

Winner of Nikon In-frame 'perspectives' competition - December 2013
Winner of the Viewbug 'Architecture - People's Choice' competition award.

Available Editions:
Small Edition - A4 approx. (150) Printed by the artist.
Original Edition - A3 approx. (50) Printed by the artist. !!! SOLD OUT !!!
Medium Edition - From A3 up to 30" tall (150) Printed by 3rd party professional lab.
Large Edition - Above 30" long edge (150) Printed by 3rd party professional lab.
Total Edition Size = 500

Framing and mounting available - please ask for further information

Rest assured your print will reach you in perfect condition - guaranteed.

(low-res image to protect copyright)

Materials used:

Archival quality inks and fine art paper

Tags:
#black and white #monochrome #pattern #geometry #spiral #spiral staircase #queens house #stairway #tulip staircase #red chip 

We want you to love your art! If you are not completely satisfied with your purchase you can return it free within 14 days, no questions asked. Learn more

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Ben Robson Hull

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