Original artwork description:

Whirling in a loop of a serpentine road when leaving Sevastopol in the direction of Inkerman, it doesn't matter if you go by car or by rail, it's hard to ignore one of the local mountain peaks. At the foot of which there is a temple cave complex, and at the top are the ruins of the ancient Byzantine fortress of Kalamita.

The fate of all fortresses is approximately the same. Numerous dates of construction, destruction and restoration alternate in historical essays. After all, each new era requires the modernization of protective structures, until the fortress loses its functional purpose. The ruins of only the latest modifications reach our days. By which you can partially recreate the appearance in which she took her last battle.

Historians begin to count the history of the Kalamita fortress from the 6th century, and the found early fortifications, built by the Byzantines to defend the approaches to Chersonesos, date back to this century. But there is an opinion that its history is even older, just no one has dug deeper yet.

The bulk of information about the fortress dates back to the 15th century. When the principality of Theodoro, in conflict with the Genoese colonies, "cuts through" an outlet for itself to the sea. At the mouth of the Chernaya River, the port of Avlita is being built, which violates the sphere of complete maritime influence of the Genoese. And for protection, the abandoned fortress is being restored.

The port of Avlita has become a strong competitor, the neighboring Genoese port of Chembalo (Balaklava). This provoked numerous capture attempts. In 1434 the fortress was captured and burned, then repulsed back by the Theodorites and restored. But not for long. In 1475 the fortress came under the rule of the Ottoman Empire and acquired a new name Inkerman, which means "cave fortress". She got this name for a reason. Around the fortress there were quarries for the extraction of white stone from the time of the Byzantine rule. In places where man-made cave cavities were formed. The stone was mined there to this day, so most of the mountain range was sorted out brick by brick in the literal sense of the word.

The Turks significantly rebuilt the fortress, doubling the thickness of the walls and towers. That allowed her in the future, being already abandoned, to survive two defenses of Sevastopol during the Crimean War and later World War II.

Now the fortress is a few ruined towers and walls, a small moat with stone casemates and breathtaking panoramas.

Materials used:

oil, linen canvas

Tags:
#architectural #castle #ruins #fortress #architectural landscape #ancient architecture #ancient cultures #ruins of ancient city #ruins artwork #ruins of a castle 
Fortress Kalamita. Inkerman (2021)
Oil painting
by Artem Shubin

£366.87 Alert
or from just £28/month Learn more

Original artwork description
Minus

Whirling in a loop of a serpentine road when leaving Sevastopol in the direction of Inkerman, it doesn't matter if you go by car or by rail, it's hard to ignore one of the local mountain peaks. At the foot of which there is a temple cave complex, and at the top are the ruins of the ancient Byzantine fortress of Kalamita.

The fate of all fortresses is approximately the same. Numerous dates of construction, destruction and restoration alternate in historical essays. After all, each new era requires the modernization of protective structures, until the fortress loses its functional purpose. The ruins of only the latest modifications reach our days. By which you can partially recreate the appearance in which she took her last battle.

Historians begin to count the history of the Kalamita fortress from the 6th century, and the found early fortifications, built by the Byzantines to defend the approaches to Chersonesos, date back to this century. But there is an opinion that its history is even older, just no one has dug deeper yet.

The bulk of information about the fortress dates back to the 15th century. When the principality of Theodoro, in conflict with the Genoese colonies, "cuts through" an outlet for itself to the sea. At the mouth of the Chernaya River, the port of Avlita is being built, which violates the sphere of complete maritime influence of the Genoese. And for protection, the abandoned fortress is being restored.

The port of Avlita has become a strong competitor, the neighboring Genoese port of Chembalo (Balaklava). This provoked numerous capture attempts. In 1434 the fortress was captured and burned, then repulsed back by the Theodorites and restored. But not for long. In 1475 the fortress came under the rule of the Ottoman Empire and acquired a new name Inkerman, which means "cave fortress". She got this name for a reason. Around the fortress there were quarries for the extraction of white stone from the time of the Byzantine rule. In places where man-made cave cavities were formed. The stone was mined there to this day, so most of the mountain range was sorted out brick by brick in the literal sense of the word.

The Turks significantly rebuilt the fortress, doubling the thickness of the walls and towers. That allowed her in the future, being already abandoned, to survive two defenses of Sevastopol during the Crimean War and later World War II.

Now the fortress is a few ruined towers and walls, a small moat with stone casemates and breathtaking panoramas.

Materials used:

oil, linen canvas

Tags:
#architectural #castle #ruins #fortress #architectural landscape #ancient architecture #ancient cultures #ruins of ancient city #ruins artwork #ruins of a castle 
  • N/A

Unfortunately Artem Shubin does not ship to ....

Change country
Ask Artem Shubin to request a shipping rate.

We want you to love your art! If you are not completely satisfied with your purchase you can return it free within 14 days, no questions asked. Learn more


This artwork is sold by Artem Shubin from Russia

Visit Artem Shubin shop

Artem Shubin

Location Russia

About
I really love hiking, wildlife and history. I often combine these two hobbies. I pack up a backpack, take a supply of canvases and go for 2-3 days, somewhere in... Read more

View all