🌳 2 trees planted for each artwork sold 🌳
10% off full price items code: TREE10 ·  15% off $695+ code: TREE15  ·  20% off $1,100+ code: TREE20  ·  Ends 5th December  ·  Terms
  🌳 2 trees planted for each artwork sold 🌳
10% off full price items code: TREE10
15% off $695+ code: TREE15
20% off $1,100+ code: TREE20
Ends 5th December  · Terms
  🌳 2 trees planted for each artwork sold 🌳
10% off full price items code: TREE10
15% off $695+ code: TREE15
20% off $1,100+ code: TREE20
Ends 5th December  · Terms

Sushil Sakhuja

Joined Artfinder: Sept. 2018

Artworks for sale: 5

India

About Sushil Sakhuja

 
 
  • Biography
    Dhokra art of Bastar (lost wax process) 

    "…India is virtually the only country in the world today which stands with one foot 

    still firmly planted in a handicraft era reaching back over a time cycle of five millennia…"

    - Ruth Reeves.

    Dhokra meaning "oldest" is an ancient folk craft. Some say it originated at the time of the Sumerian Culture in 2000 BC at the Indus Valley. Indeed many an expert see in it traces of pre-metal works in bamboo and cane. Today, practiced by artisans who live in the vicinity of the Vindhyas and the Eastern Ghats, in and around Bihar, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, and West Bengal, these crafts continue to represent the culture, belief, and tradition of their remarkable craftsmen and the place they call home. Called by different names depending on the region that they move around in, these artisans, be it the Dhokras, Ghantrars or the Ghoruas have for countless years created fascinating metalwork using the "Lost wax process ( Cire - perdue )". Their way of life has been a difficult one, for they represent a section of the community with no land and no steady income. Leading a nomadic life, their craft has been the most enduring aspect of their existence. Slight changes depending on the location notwithstanding, their creations share a more or less similar birthing process. 

    Initially, fine sand and clay is used to make the basic mold. The process called core building varies from place to place only in the type of materials used. Some add goat-dung others cow-dung or husk etc to the clay, the principal material. The wax preparation thereafter involves the use of pure bee-wax. Found in abundance in the jungle terrain where these craftsmen reside, the bee-wax is melted over an open fire and strained through a fine cloth into a basin of water. This ensuing wax is kept absolutely clean and free of impurities. The wax thread, its thickness depending on the wish of the workman is then prepared from this. 
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Biography

Dhokra art of Bastar (lost wax process) 

"…India is virtually the only country in the world today which stands with one foot 

still firmly planted in a handicraft era reaching back over a time cycle of five millennia…"

- Ruth Reeves.

Dhokra meaning "oldest" is an ancient folk craft. Some say it originated at the time of the Sumerian Culture in 2000 BC at the Indus Valley. Indeed many an expert see in it traces of pre-metal works in bamboo and cane. Today, practiced by artisans who live in the vicinity of the Vindhyas and the Eastern Ghats, in and around Bihar, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, and West Bengal, these crafts continue to represent the culture, belief, and tradition of their remarkable craftsmen and the place they call home. Called by different names depending on the region that they move around in, these artisans, be it the Dhokras, Ghantrars or the Ghoruas have for countless years created fascinating metalwork using the "Lost wax process ( Cire - perdue )". Their way of life has been a difficult one, for they represent a section of the community with no land and no steady income. Leading a nomadic life, their craft has been the most enduring aspect of their existence. Slight changes depending on the location notwithstanding, their creations share a more or less similar birthing process. 

Initially, fine sand and clay is used to make the basic mold. The process called core building varies from place to place only in the type of materials used. Some add goat-dung others cow-dung or husk etc to the clay, the principal material. The wax preparation thereafter involves the use of pure bee-wax. Found in abundance in the jungle terrain where these craftsmen reside, the bee-wax is melted over an open fire and strained through a fine cloth into a basin of water. This ensuing wax is kept absolutely clean and free of impurities. The wax thread, its thickness depending on the wish of the workman is then prepared from this. 
 
 
 
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