CHARLES ASH

Joined Artfinder: Sept. 2017

Artworks for sale: 157

United States

About CHARLES ASH

 
 
  • Biography
    “I am in heaven living and working in New Mexico and especially Santa Fe” Ash goes on, “The massing, colors and textures of the pueblos are reminiscent of modern architecture in the twentieth century.“ The layering of the masses is a hall mark of southwest architecture and one of the elements that translates into Ash’s work.
    “I love the variety of landscapes and being able to drive 20 minutes to trails leading into wilderness areas. When you arrive at Northern New Mexico, you immediately understand what has drawn artists for the past 150 years. Most of all the blending of the three cultures: Spanish, Native American and Anglo gives me so much to draw from”

    Growing up, his parents were avid and rather eclectic art collectors; contemporary, traditional, sculpture, Native American and East Asian were all part of his environment. He was exposed to the forms and colors of Spanish, Native American and especially the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright. He was always drawing and during high school he took every art class available to the point that his art teacher allowed him private studio time.
    It wasn’t until Ash attended the College of Architecture at the University of Arizona in Tucson (with its curriculum that heavily emphasized sketching and drawing) that he discovered the art and architecture, motifs, paintings, culture and minimalism of Japan. It was at this time that he took a watercolor class taught by Al Miller…. and immediately fell in love with watercolors.

    Initially of course the images created were architecture of the southwest; adobes, pueblos, western settlement and architectural renderings. Ash then developed figurative works that express a dynamic quality; using the figure as an opportunity to introduce color and motion. After moving to Santa Fe, he started hiking up into the wilderness, finding a comfortable rock and painting what was before him.

    His work draws from the forms, colors and experiences of the desert Southwest; an enjoyment in the act of painting expressing a simpler, more casual approach to life. Ash creates watercolor paintings that capture shadow, form and space; an approach where he relies on the quality of light and shadow to give a bold quality to his work. He loves working quickly with paint, looking for the spontaneity and happy accidents that occur with a rough watercolor paper.

    Abstract images started from working with monotypes, a printing process that allowed him to deconstruct an image, explore pure color and expressionism.
    Then in 2014, Ash started painting-a-day series using loose watercolor washes quickly over a very rough paper with a Japanese writing brush; which the minimalism parallels my architectural practice. As part of the minimalism he has started to experiment with "Bokusho" the art of abstract expressionism through the medium of Japanese calligraphy. While the forms are not intended to be 'writing' the expressive marks produced retain all the power and fluid grace that Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) exhibits.

    “I enjoy the ability to express myself using a large Japanese brush, ink, water and good quality paper whether that is hot press, watercolor paper or rice paper. I find Bokusho stimulating and it is a huge challenge to let go of all my pre-conceptions of what I want on the paper and to just let it happen in front of me. “


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Biography

“I am in heaven living and working in New Mexico and especially Santa Fe” Ash goes on, “The massing, colors and textures of the pueblos are reminiscent of modern architecture in the twentieth century.“ The layering of the masses is a hall mark of southwest architecture and one of the elements that translates into Ash’s work.
“I love the variety of landscapes and being able to drive 20 minutes to trails leading into wilderness areas. When you arrive at Northern New Mexico, you immediately understand what has drawn artists for the past 150 years. Most of all the blending of the three cultures: Spanish, Native American and Anglo gives me so much to draw from”

Growing up, his parents were avid and rather eclectic art collectors; contemporary, traditional, sculpture, Native American and East Asian were all part of his environment. He was exposed to the forms and colors of Spanish, Native American and especially the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright. He was always drawing and during high school he took every art class available to the point that his art teacher allowed him private studio time.
It wasn’t until Ash attended the College of Architecture at the University of Arizona in Tucson (with its curriculum that heavily emphasized sketching and drawing) that he discovered the art and architecture, motifs, paintings, culture and minimalism of Japan. It was at this time that he took a watercolor class taught by Al Miller…. and immediately fell in love with watercolors.

Initially of course the images created were architecture of the southwest; adobes, pueblos, western settlement and architectural renderings. Ash then developed figurative works that express a dynamic quality; using the figure as an opportunity to introduce color and motion. After moving to Santa Fe, he started hiking up into the wilderness, finding a comfortable rock and painting what was before him.

His work draws from the forms, colors and experiences of the desert Southwest; an enjoyment in the act of painting expressing a simpler, more casual approach to life. Ash creates watercolor paintings that capture shadow, form and space; an approach where he relies on the quality of light and shadow to give a bold quality to his work. He loves working quickly with paint, looking for the spontaneity and happy accidents that occur with a rough watercolor paper.

Abstract images started from working with monotypes, a printing process that allowed him to deconstruct an image, explore pure color and expressionism.
Then in 2014, Ash started painting-a-day series using loose watercolor washes quickly over a very rough paper with a Japanese writing brush; which the minimalism parallels my architectural practice. As part of the minimalism he has started to experiment with "Bokusho" the art of abstract expressionism through the medium of Japanese calligraphy. While the forms are not intended to be 'writing' the expressive marks produced retain all the power and fluid grace that Shodo (Japanese Calligraphy) exhibits.

“I enjoy the ability to express myself using a large Japanese brush, ink, water and good quality paper whether that is hot press, watercolor paper or rice paper. I find Bokusho stimulating and it is a huge challenge to let go of all my pre-conceptions of what I want on the paper and to just let it happen in front of me. “


 
 
 
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