Artist's description:

Marion Anderson was the inspiration for this portrait of another woman who changed the world. I used oil over encaustic, fusing the paint into the wax base for permanency; sometimes scratching through the paint to reveal some of the colors in the wax. This is on cradled board and needs no framing.

"Anderson became an important figure in the struggle for black artists to overcome racial prejudice in the United States during the mid-twentieth century. In 1939, the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) refused permission for Anderson to sing to an integrated audience in Constitution Hall. The incident placed Anderson into the spotlight of the international community on a level unusual for a classical musician. With the aid of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and her husband Franklin D. Roosevelt, Anderson performed a critically acclaimed open-air concert on Easter Sunday, April 9, 1939, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. She sang before a crowd of more than 75,000 people and a radio audience in the millions. Anderson continued to break barriers for black artists in the United States, becoming the first black person, American or otherwise, to perform at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City on January 7, 1955. Her performance as Ulrica in Giuseppe Verdi's Un ballo in maschera at the Met was the only time she sang an opera role on stage."

Materials used:

oil paint, beeswax, tree resin

Marian Anderson, A Woman Who Changed the World (2015)

$1,800

  • Painting, Other
  • One of a kind artwork
  • Size: 24 × 24 × 2 in (unframed) / 24 × 24 in (actual image size)
  • This artwork is sold unframed
  • Signed on the front
  • Ready to hang
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