Dancers Embrace (2016)
One of a kind sculpture by Tawanda Makore


  • One of a kind sculpture, Other
  • One of a kind artwork
  • Size: 18 × 28 × 18 in / 18 × 28 in (actual image size)
  • Signed on the back

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Artist's description:

A beautiful sculpture expressing the bond in relationship. This is both delightful to view and to touch and has stunning coloration due to the minerals within the stone. Unlike other forms of sculpture it is unique since the patterns in the stone cannot be replicated. The piece is carved using a diamond tipped chisel. It is then sanded for literally hours through varying degrees of sand paper until the artist reaches 2500 grade sand paper. The sculpture is then heated and a polish is melted into the stone. Finally it is buffered to leave this wonderfully tactile surface. The stunning colors found within the stone are brought to view on the surface.

Perhaps the perfect ornament to fill that special space. Or maybe a different kind of gift for that special someone or occasion. The sculpture is suitable for inside or outside the home, requiring minimal care.

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Tawanda Makore was born in 1979. Tawanda was inspired at an early age by his sculptor uncle Akence Makore, and later by cubic sculptor Brighton Sango. By the age of 11 years, when his family moved to Matabeleland, Tawanda found a ready market for his work at the Bulawayo National Gallery.He later worked alongside another of his uncles in Guruve, Albert Makore, and was also exposed to the work of many sculptors in the area. He was a member of Sanganai Art Group for some years and more recently has been a founder member of The Sculptors Community.
In 2014 he has plans to visit the Netherlands on a work shop program.Tawanda’s work is generally abstract in form, drawing inspiration from ever changing shapes of his namesake (Makore [Shona]=clouds).

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